610: Sourced News

What’s your main source of news?


Full episode script

In 1960, the Pilkington Committee on Broadcasting in the UK concluded that, quote:

“until there is unmistakable proof to the contrary, the presumption must be that television is and will be a main factor in influencing the values and moral standards of our society.”

 

In 2017, Oxford University released a study on where UK residents got their news. Quote:

The move from traditional sources of news like television and printed newspapers is particularly clear if we look at differences between age groups. There are very clear generational divides. Asked to identify their main source of news, online comes out number one in every age group under 45 — and for those under 25, social media are by now more popular than television.

 

In the United States, that trend is holding true as well. To quote from the Pew Research Center from 2017:

As of August, 43% of Americans report often getting news online, just 7 percentage points lower than the 50% who often get news on television, according to a Pew Research Center survey conducted in August. This gap between the two news platforms was 19 points in early 2016, more than twice as large. The share of Americans who often get news from TV – whether from local TV news, nightly network TV news or cable news – is down from 57% in early 2016. At the same time, the portion of Americans often getting news online, either from news websites/apps or social media, grew from 38% in early 2016 to 43% today.

 

While all of these sources are places we actually get the news, it says nothing about how much those news media sources are to be trusted, or how much we think that they’re worth proactively interacting with. Either way, no matter how we feel about it, the place we go to to actually get the information informs what our reactions are, because what comes in will have an impact on how we react and interact with the information.

This script may vary from the actual episode transcript.